Criminal Justice, AS (AF33) Degree


Campus Locations: Moultrie (Veterans Parkway), Thomasville, Tifton, Bainbridge

The Criminal Justice associate of science degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for Criminal Justice professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Criminal Justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Criminal Justice associate of science degree. Graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of career potential. Entry-level persons will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the corrections, security, investigative, and police administration fields. Completion of the Criminal Justice associate of science degree does not ensure certification of officer status in Georgia. Students must seek such certification from the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Council.

Length of Program: Five (5) Semesters

Entrance Dates: Beginning of each semester.

Entrance Requirements: Refer to Admissions criteria. Click for Entrance Score Requirements.

Age: Applicant must be 16 years of age or older.

Education: An applicant must be a high school graduate or the equivalent (GED). College transcripts will be evaluated on an individual basis.

Advisor: A Program Advisor should be consulted prior to enrolling in any course. An advisor will be assigned by admissions.

Note: Students who intend to become certified as a Criminal Justice Practitioner should understand that according to the Georgia Peace Officer and Standards Training (P.O.S.T.) Council, each applicant "shall not have been convicted by any state or by the federal government of any crime the punishment for which could have been imprisonment in the federal or state prison or institution nor have been convicted of sufficient misdemeanors to establish a pattern of disregard for the law, provided that, for purposes of this paragraph, violations of traffic laws and other offenses involving the operation of motor vehicles when the applicant has received a pardon shall not be considered." This means that the Council will require a thorough Criminal and Traffic History be completed to include, but not limited to: a Certified Driver’s History, a Georgia Crime Information Center, and a National Crime Information Center printout.

The P.O.S.T. Council also has other requirements for certification. See program advisor for this additional information.

Additional Requirements: A Criminal background check and drug toxicology may be required for Internship/Externship and/or Employer. Results will affect employment options and will need to be discussed with advisor.

Program Final Exit Point: Criminal Justice, Associate of Science.

Credits Required for Graduation: 67 minimum semester hour credits required for graduation.

Students with Basic Peace Officer certification and/or Basic Correctional Officer certification may be eligible for prior learning credits, This will be addressed on an individual basis if requested by the student. Refer to the Advanced Placement Credit section of the Handbook.

Cost
Books: $886.10
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,687.10
Books: $675.80
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,476.80
Books: $637.80
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,200.00
Total: $2,138.80
Books: $500.00
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,200.00
Total: $2,001.00
Books: $701.90
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,200.00
Total: $2,202.90
Curriculum Outline (70 hours)
1: General Education Courses (31 hours) 31
Area I: Language Arts/Communications (6 Hours) 6
ENGL 1101

Co-requisite(s): ENGL 0090 and/or Entrance exam reading and writing scores in accordance with approved TCSG admission score levels. Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
ENGL 1102

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better. Emphasizes the student*s ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.

3
Area II: Social/Behavioral Sciences (12 hours) 12
POLS 1101

Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.

3
Area III: Natural Sciences\Mathematics 7
One Natural Science Course and Lab
Area IV: Humanities/FIne Arts Humanities/Fine Arts Elective 3
And one additional course from Area I, II, III, or IV (3 Hours)(as approved by program advisor) 3
2. Institutional Course (3 Hours) 3
COLL 1500

This course is designed to provide tools to assist students to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic and professional success in their chosen occupational/ technical program of study. Topics include: Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Money Management, Study and Test Taking Skills, Stress Management and Wellness, Communications Skills, Career Exploration, Research Skills, College Campus Knowledge, Memory & Reading Skills, Presentation & Interview Skills, and Group Skills. Effective Fall 2016, students who already have an Associate Degree or higher will be given exemption credit for the COLL 1500 course.

3
3: Occupational Courses (33 hours) 33
COMP 1000

Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer and digital terminology, and usage, operating systems, Internet and digital communication, word processing applications, spreadsheet applications, database applications, and presentation applications.

3
CRJU 1010

Pre-requisite(s): Provisional Admission Introduces the development and organization of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: the American criminal justice system; constitutional limitations; organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and requirements.

3
CRJU 1030

Pre-requisites: Program Admission Provides an analysis of all phases of the American correctional system and practices, including its history, procedures, and objectives. Topics include: history and evolution of correctional facilities; legal and administrative problems; institutional facilities and procedures; probation, parole, and prerelease programs; alternative sentencing; rehabilitation; community involvement; and staffing.

3
CRJU 1040

Pre-requisites: Program Admission This course examines the principles of the organization, administration, and duties of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Topics include: history and philosophy of law enforcement, evaluation of administrative practices, problems in American law enforcement agencies, emerging concepts, professionalism, and community crime prevention programs.

3
CRJU 1068

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission This course introduces criminal law in the United States, but emphasizes the current specific status of Georgia criminal law. The course will focus on the most current statutory contents of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.) with primary emphasis on the criminal and traffic codes. Topics include: historic development of criminal law in the United States; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 16 - Crimes and Offenses; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 40 - Motor Vehicle and Traffic Offenses; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to criminal law.

3
CRJU 1400

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission This course provides an exploration ethics and cultural perspectives in criminal justice. In presenting ethics, both the individual perspective and the organizational standpoint will be examined. Four areas of ethical decision making opportunities are studied including: law enforcement ethics; correctional ethics; legal profession ethics; and policymaking ethics. The presentation of cultural perspectives is designed to aid law enforcement officers to better understand and communicate with members of other cultures with whom they come in contact in the line of duty. Topics include: defining and applying terms related to intercultural attitudes, role-play activities related to intercultural understanding, developing interpersonal/intercultural communication competence, and development of personal intercultural growth plan.

3
CRJU 2050

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Introduces the procedural law of the criminal justice system which governs the series of proceedings through which government enforces substantive criminal law. The course offers an emphasis on the laws of arrest and search and seizure; the rules of evidence, right to counsel, and the rights and duties of both citizens and officers. The course covers in depth appropriate Case Law and court rulings that dictate criminal procedure on the State and Federal Level.

3
CRJU 2060

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Introduces the nature, extent, and factors related to criminal behavior, and the etiology of criminal offenses and offenders. Topics include: sociological, psychological, and biological causes of crime; effectiveness of theories in explaining crime; theory integration; and application of theory to selected issues.

3
CRJU 2070

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Analyzes the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency, and examines processes in the field of juvenile justice. Topics include: survey of juvenile law, comparative analysis of adult and juvenile justice systems, and prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency.

3
And one of the following (3 Hours) 3
CRJU 2090

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of all required program courses. Provides experiences necessary for further professional development and exposure to related agencies in the criminal justice field. The student will pursue a professional research project supervised by the instructor. Topics include: criminal justice theory applications.

3
CRJU 2100

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of all required program courses. Provides experiences necessary for further professional development and exposure to related agencies in the criminal justice field. The student will pursue an externship in a related agency supervised by the instructor. Topics include: criminal justice theory applications.

3
And one of the following 2000 Level CRJU Electives (3 Hours) 3
CRJU 2020

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission This course emphasizes those provisions of the Bill of Rights which pertain to criminal justice. Topics include: characteristics and powers of the three branches of government; principles governing the operation of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment.

3
CRJU 2110

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission This course provides an introduction to the principles of homeland security, roles and responsibilities of constitutencies and implications for criminal justice fields. Topics include: intelligence and warning, border and transportation security, domestic counterterrorism, protecting critical infrastructure, defending against catastrophic threats, and emergency preparedness and response.

3
CRJU 2201

Pre-requisites: Program Admission This course examines the historical context on the development, functions, and controversies in the courts system. Topics include: introduction to the courts; participants of a trial; courtroom processes; and the post conviction process.

3
FOSC 2037

Pre-requisites: Program Admission While individuals have been crime victims for many years, victimology or the study of crime victims is a relatively recent discipline. The majority of criminological research and discussion has been focused on the offender rather than the victim. This course provides an overview of the principles and concepts of victimology, an analysis of victimization patterns and trends, and the role of victimology in the justice system. In addition the repercussions of victimization, victim reporting patterns and remedies available for victims are also explored.

3
Faculty
Program Chair

Criminal Justice Technology Program Chair
School of Professional Services
Thomasville

15689 US 19 North, Thomasville, GA 31792
Advisor

Criminal Justice Technology Faculty
School of Professional Services
Bainbridge

Advisor

Criminal Justice Faculty
School of Professional Services
Tifton

52 Tech Drive, Tifton, GA 31794
Advisor

Criminal Justice Faculty
School of Professional Services
Moultrie Veterans Parkway

800 North Veterans Parkway, Moultrie, GA 31788
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