Radiologic Technology, AAS (RT23) (510911)  Degree


Campus Locations: Moultrie (Veterans Parkway), Thomasville

The Radiologic Technology associate degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in radiology departments and related businesses and industries. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of didactic and clinical instruction necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an associate of applied science degree, have the qualifications of a radiographer, and are eligible to sit for a national certification examination for radiographers. Successful completion of the program will enable students to sit for the Radiography examination administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.

Length of Program: Two (2) semesters of prerequisite courses found in the Healthcare Science, TCC, Four (4) semesters of occupational courses

Program Philosophy: The concept of professional technical education, regardless of the form such education may take, is firmly based in the belief that the capability of the individual to contribute as a member of the society is related not only to the distinctive capabilities inherent in each person, but also to learned knowledge and to the development of those capabilities.

The entire operation of the Southern Regional Technical College Program of Radiologic Technology shall be directed by a very real concern for the individual student, and recognition that individual advancement, through the acquisition of knowledge and skills, enhances the ability of the student to meet his or her needs as well as those of the society.

Consistent with the philosophy, the administration and faculty of the school take the position that students are here to access a means for personal and professional growth and development. The curriculum, objectives and program policies are intended to promote this position.

Entrance Date: Prerequisite Courses open; however, all prerequisite/Competitive Admissions courses (ALHS 1090 – Medical Terminology, BIOL 2113 - Anatomy & Physiology I, BIOL 2113L - Anatomy & Physiology Lab I, BIOL 2114 - Anatomy & Physiology II, BIOL 2114L - Anatomy & Physiology Lab II, ENGL 1101 - Composition and Rhetoric, a Degree Level Mathematics Course, a Social Science Elective, a Humanities Elective, and a General Core Elective) must be successfully completed prior to competitive program admission deadline.

Radiologic Technology Competitive Admissions Criteria Requirements:

Program Admission: Fall Semester

Entrance Requirements: Entry into this program is based on competitive admissions criteria. Contact the program advisor or admissions for details. Completion of prerequisite courses does not guarantee admission into the program. For further details, Please see the Competitive Admissions Policy. Click for Entrance Score Requirements.

Age: Applicant must be 18 years of age or older prior to first clinical course (RADT 1320).

Education: An applicant must be a high school graduate or the equivalent (GED). College transcripts will be evaluated on an individual basis.

Advisor: A Program Advisor should be consulted prior to enrolling in any course. An advisor will be assigned by admissions.

Additional Requirements: American Heart Healthcare Provider CPR Certification, Physical Exam, Criminal Background Check, and Drug Toxicology.

Note: Individuals who have been convicted of a felony offense may be denied licensure or certification. Applications for state licensure are reviewed by the designated governing body or certification by the A.R.R.T.. Licensure/Certification requirements may vary by state. Graduates of the program will submit application to The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists during the final semester of the program.

Program Final Exit Point: Radiologic Technology, Associate of Applied Science. Eligible to apply for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist exam.

Credits Required for Graduation: 80 minimum semester hour credits required for graduation.

Accreditation Information: The Radiologic Technology program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), 20 North Wacker Drive Suite 2850, Chicago, Illinois 60606-3182, Phone: 312-704-5300, http://www.jrcert.org.

The Moultrie Program was last reaffirmed: November 2022, Next comprehensive review is expected no later than 2026.

The Thomasville Program was affirmed July 2022.

Cost
Books: $789.96
Fees: $326.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,615.96
Books: $736.70
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,300.00
Total: $2,337.70
Books: $921.71
Fees: $761.00
Tuition: $1,300.00
Total: $2,982.71
Books: $399.20
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,200.20
Books: $260.80
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,100.00
Total: $1,661.80
Books: $52.77
Fees: $762.00
Tuition: $1,200.00
Total: $2,014.77
Curriculum Outline (80 hours)
1: General Core Courses (15 Hours) 15
Area I: Language Arts/Communications (3 Hours) 3
ENGL 1101

Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Area II: Social/Behavioral Sciences (3 Hours) 3
Area III: Natural Sciences/Mathematics (3 Hours)
Area IV: Humanities/Fine Arts (3 Hours) 3
And one additional course from Area I, II, III, or IV (3 Hours)(as approved by program advisor) 3
2: Institutional Credit (3 hours) 3
COLL 1500

This course is designed to provide tools to assist students to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic and professional success in their chosen occupational/ technical program of study. Topics include: Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Money Management, Study and Test Taking Skills, Stress Management and Wellness, Communications Skills, Career Exploration, Research Skills, College Campus Knowledge, Memory & Reading Skills, Presentation & Interview Skills, and Group Skills. Effective Fall 2016, students who already have an Associate Degree or higher will be given exemption credit for the COLL 1500 course.

3
3: Occupational Courses (62 hours) 62
ALHS 1090

Pre-requisite(s): Provisional Admission Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy.

2
BIOL 2113

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101 Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2113L

Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113: ENGL 1101 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.

1
BIOL 2114

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2114L Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.

3
BIOL 2114L

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2114 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.

1
RADT 1010

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): RADT 1030, RADT 1320 Introduces medical imaging and radiologic science and health care professions with an emphasis on ethics and professionalism. Fundamental principles of radiation protection, equipment operation, and exposure are discussed. Medical imaging services are described with instruction regarding patient care including patient interactions and preparation. Topics include: introduction to medical imaging and radiologic sciences and health care, ethics and law in medical imaging and radiologic sciences, patient care and services in the medical imaging and radiologic sciences, basic principles of radiation protection and exposure, equipment introduction, and patient interactions/preparation.

4
RADT 1030

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114L Pre/Co-requisite(s): RADT 1010 Introduces the knowledge required to perform radiologic procedures applicable to the human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed on the production of quality radiographs, and laboratory experience will demonstrate the application of theoretical principles and concepts. Topics include: introduction to radiographic procedures; positioning terminology; positioning considerations; procedures, anatomy, and topographical anatomy related to body cavities, bony thorax, upper extremities, shoulder girdle; and lower extremities.

3
RADT 1060

Pre-requisite(s): RADT 1010, RADT 1030 Co-requisite(s): RADT 1330 Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the pelvic girdle; anatomy and routine projections of the spine, gastrointestinal (GI) procedures; genitourinary (GU) procedures; biliary system procedures; and minor procedures.

3
RADT 1065

Pre/Co-requisite(s): RADT 1030 Content of this course is designed to establish a basic knowledge a basic knowledge of atomic structure and terminology. Other topics include the nature and characteristics of x-radiation, ionizing, and non-ionizing radiation; x-ray production; the properties of x-rays and the fundamentals of x-ray photon interaction with matter.

2
RADT 1075

Pre/Co-requisite(s): RADT 1060 The content of this course introduces factors that govern and influence the production of the radiographic image using analog and digital radiographic equipment found in diagnostic radiology. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge and techniques required to produce high quality diagnostic radiographic images. Topics include: Image quality (radiographic density; radiographic contrast; recorded detail; distortion; grids; image receptors and holders (analog and digital); processing considerations (analog and digital); image acquisition (analog, digital, and PACS); image analysis; image artifacts (analog and digital); guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system will assist students to bridge between film-based and digital imaging systems. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Laboratory experiences will demonstrate applications of theoretical principles and concepts.

4
RADT 1085

Pre/Co-requisite(s): RADT 1060 Content establishes a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic and mobile equipment requirements and design. The content also provides a basic knowledge of Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) devices, beam restriction, filtration, quality control, and quality management principles of analog and digital systems. Laboratory experiences will demonstrate applications of theoretical principles and concepts.

3
RADT 1200

Pre/Co-requisite(s): RADT 1030 Cellular biology and the molecular effects of ionizing radiation are reviewed. The various health effects of radiation exposure are explained including variations in cell radiosensitivity and response. Units and measures used to evaluate radiation exposure and the agencies and regulations involved in radiation safety are presented. Elements of a personnel monitoring program are identified. Radiation protection tools and methods including personnel and patient radiation protection techniques are discussed. Topics include: introduction to radiation biology, radiation energy transfer, radiation effects, radiosensitivity and response, introduction to radiation protection, units, detection, and measurement, surveys, regulatory/advisory agencies, and regulations, personnel monitoring, application, patient protection, and personnel protection.

2
RADT 1320

Pre/Co-requisite(s): RADT 1030 Content and clinical practice experience should be designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and professional development are discussed, examined, and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient before, during and following the radiologic procedure.

4
RADT 1330

Pre-requisite(s): RADT 1010, RADT 1030, RADT 1320 Co-requisite(s): RADT 1060 Content and clinical practice experience should be designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and professional development are discussed, examined, and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient before, during and following the radiologic procedure.

7
RADT 2090

Pre-requisite(s): RADT 1060 Co-requisite(s): RADT 1330, RADT 2340 Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the cranium; anatomy and routine projections of the facial bones; anatomy and routine projections of the sinuses; sectional anatomy of the head, neck,thorax and abdomen.

2
RADT 2260

Pre-requisite(s): RADT 1200, RADT 2090, RADT 2340 Co-requisite(s): RADT 2360 Provides a review of basic knowledge from previous courses and helps the student prepare for national certification examinations for radiographers. Topics include: Patient Care (Patient Interactions and Management), Safety (Radiation Physics, Radiobiology and Radiation Protection), Image Production (Image Acquisition, Technical Evaluation, Equipment Operation and Quality Assurance), and Procedures (Head, Spine, Pelvis, Thorax, Abdomen and Extremities).

3
RADT 2340

Pre-requisite(s): RADT 1330 Content and clinical practice experience should be designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and professional development are discussed, examined, and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient before, during and following the radiologic procedure.

6
RADT 2360

Pre-requisite(s): RADT 2340 Co-requisite(s): RADT 2260 Content and clinical practice experience should be designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and professional development are discussed, examined, and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient before, during and following the radiologic procedure.

9
Faculty
Program Chair

Radiologic Technology Program Chair
School of Health Sciences
Moultrie Veterans Parkway

800 North Veterans Parkway, Moultrie, GA 31788
Program Chair

Radiologic Technology Program Chair
School of Health Sciences
Thomasville

15689 US 19 North, Thomasville, GA 31792
Advisor

Radiologic Technology Clinical Coordinator
School of Health Sciences
Thomasville

15689 US 19 North, Thomasville, GA 31792
Advisor

Radiologic Technology Clinical Coordinator
School of Health Sciences
Moultrie Veterans Parkway

800 North Veterans Parkway, Moultrie, GA 31768
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