Interdisciplinary Studies (Marketing Track), AAS (AF53) Degree


Campus Locations: Moultrie (Veterans Parkway), Thomasville, Tifton, Cairo, Online, Bainbridge, Blakely

The Associate of Applied Science Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (AIS) is designed based on each student’s academic and professional goals. The AIS requires 61 semester credit hours. Areas of concentration include General Education, Marketing, and Health Sciences. The program curriculum is strategically selected to build upon the student’s goals and objectives. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition or continued education. A student might choose an interdisciplinary studies program if his or her specific goals and interests cannot be met through the college’s existing degrees, diplomas, and certificates.

Entrance Date: Beginning of each semester.

Entrance Requirements: Refer to Admissions criteria. Click for Entrance Score Requirements.

Age: Applicant must be 16 years of age or older.

Education: An applicant must be a high school graduate or the equivalent (GED). College transcripts will be evaluated on an individual basis.

Advisor: A Program Advisor should be consulted prior to enrolling in any course. An advisor will be assigned by admissions.

Program Final Exit Point: Interdisciplinary Studies, Associate of Applied Science.

Credits Required for Graduation: 61 minimum semester hour credits required for graduation.

Cost
Books: $500.00
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,301.00
Books: $500.00
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,301.00
Books: $500.00
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,301.00
Books: $500.00
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,301.00
Books: $500.00
Fees: $301.00
Tuition: $1,500.00
Total: $2,301.00
Curriculum Outline (61 hours)
1. General Education Courses 21
Area I: Language Arts/Communication 3
ENGL 1101

Co-requisite(s): ENGL 0090 and/or Entrance exam reading and writing scores in accordance with approved TCSG admission score levels. Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Choose 3 credit hours from the Area I below: 3
ENGL 1102

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better. Emphasizes the student*s ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.

3
SPCH 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.

3
Area II: Social/Behavioral Sciences 6
PSYC 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Entrance exam reading and writing scores in accordance with approved TCSG admission score levels Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.

3
SOCI 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Entrance exam reading and writing scores in accordance with approved TCSG admission score levels Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.

3
POLS 1101

Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.

3
ECON 1101

Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective

3
ECON 2105

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Provides a description and analysis of macroeconomic principles and policies. Topics include basic economic principles, macroeconomic concepts, equilibrium in the goods and money markets, macroeconomic equilibrium and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies.

3
ECON 2106

Provides an analysis of the ways in which consumers and business firms interact in a market economy. Topics include basic economic principles, consumer choice, behavior of profit maximizing firms, modeling of perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly and monopolistic competition.

3
HIST 1111

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance

3
HIST 1112

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of the intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from early modern times to the present. Topics include transitions to the Modern World, scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, political modernization, economic modernization, imperialism, and the Twentieth Century.

3
HIST 2111

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of U. S. History to 1877 to include the post-Civil War period. The course focuses on the period from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War to include geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people. It includes the history of Georgia and its constitutional development. Topics include colonization and expansion; the Revolutionary Era; the New Nation; nationalism, sectionalism, and reform; the Era of Expansion; and crisis, Civil War, and reconstruction.

3
HIST 2112

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from 1865 to the beginning of the twenty-first century and will equip the student to better understand the problems and challenges of the contemporary world in relation to events and trends in modern American history. The course also provides an overview of the history of Georgia and the development of its constitution. Topics include the Reconstruction Period; the great West, the new South, and the rise of the debtor; the Gilded Age; the progressive movement; the emergence of the U. S. in world affairs; the Roaring Twenties; the Great Depression; World War II; the Cold War and the 1950's; the 1960's and 1970's; and America since 1980.

3
Area III: Natural Sciences/Mathematics 6
MATH 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Placement Test Score or Co-requisite MATH 0090. Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.

3
MATH 1103

This course focuses on quantitive skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will be likely to encounter. The course emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined. Students will use appropriate technology to enhance mathematical thinking and understanding. Topics covered in this course include: sets and set operations, logic, basic probability, data analysis, linear models, quadratic models, exponential and logarithmic models, geometry, and financial management.

3
MATH 1111

Co-requisite(s): Appropriate Placement Test Score or Co-requisite MATH 0090 Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
Choose 3 or more credit hours from the Area III courses below (lab is required with a science course): 3
BIOL 1111

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1111L Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts with a focus on living cells. Topics include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, biotechnology, and evolution.

3
BIOL 1111L

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1111 Selected Lab exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1111. The lab exercises include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, biotechnology, and evolution.

1
BIOL 1112

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 1111, BIOL 1111L Pre/Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1112L Provides an introduction to basic animal and plant diversity, structure and function, including reproduction and development, and the dynamics of ecology as it pertains to populations, communities, ecosystems, and biosphere. Topics include classification and characterizations of organisms, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, principles of ecology, and biosphere.

3
BIOL 1112L

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 1111, BIOL 1111L Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1112 Selected lab exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1112. The lab exercises for this course include classification and characterization oforganisms, plant structure and function, animal structure and function and principles of ecology and biosphere.

1
BIOL 2113

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101 Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2113L

Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113: ENGL 1101 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.

1
BIOL 2114

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2114L Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.

3
BIOL 2114L

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2114 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.

1
BIOL 2117

Pre-requisite(s): (BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L) OR (BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2117L Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.

3
BIOL 2117L

Pre-requisite(s): (BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L) OR (BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2117 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.

1
CHEM 1151

Pre/Co-requisite(s): Degree Level Mathematics Course, CHEM 1151L Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurements and units, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

3
CHEM 1151L

Pre/Co-requisite(s): Degree Level Mathematics Course, CHEM 1151 Selected laboratory experiments paralleling the topics in CHEM 1151. The lab exercises for this course include units of measurements, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

1
CHEM 1152

Pre-requisite(s): CHEM 1151, CHEM 1151L Co-requisite (s): CHEM 1152L Provides an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. This survey will include an overview of the properties, structure, nomenclature, reactions of hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, ethers, halides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, amides; the properties, structure, and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes, as well as, intermediary metabolism. Topics include basic principles, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon derivatives, heterocyclic rings and alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids and fats, proteins, nucleic acids, and intermediary metabolism.

3
CHEM 1152L

Pre-requisite(s): CHEM 1151, CHEM 1151L Pre/Co-requisite(s): CHEM 1152 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1152. The laboratory exercises for this course include basic principles of organic chemistry, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon derivatives, heterocyclic rings and alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids and fats, proteins, nucleic acids, and intermediary metabolism.

1
PHYS 1110

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 AND (MATH 1101, MATH 1103, OR MATH 1111) Pre/Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1110L Introduces some of the basic laws of physics. Topics include systems of units and conversion of units, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.

3
PHYS 1110L

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 AND (MATH 1101, MATH 1103, OR MATH 1111) Pre/Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1110 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in PHYS 1110. The laboratory exercises for this course include systems of units and systems of measurement, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.

1
MATH 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Placement Test Score or Co-requisite MATH 0090. Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.

3
MATH 1103

This course focuses on quantitive skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will be likely to encounter. The course emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined. Students will use appropriate technology to enhance mathematical thinking and understanding. Topics covered in this course include: sets and set operations, logic, basic probability, data analysis, linear models, quadratic models, exponential and logarithmic models, geometry, and financial management.

3
MATH 1111

Co-requisite(s): Appropriate Placement Test Score or Co-requisite MATH 0090 Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
MATH 1113

Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1111 with a “C” or better or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Prepares students for calculus. The topics discussed include an intensive study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum and minimum problems, exponential growth and decay.

3
MATH 1127

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Algebra Placement Test Score or MATH 1111 with a “C” or better. Emphasizes the concepts and methods fundamental to utilizing and interpreting commonly used statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing chi square tests, and linear regression.

3
Area IV: Humanities 3
ARTS 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Explores the visual arts and the relationship to human needs and aspirations. Students investigate the value of art, themes in art, the elements and principles of composition, and the materials and processes used for artistic expression. Well-known works of visual art are explored. The course encourages student interest in the visual arts beyond the classroom.

3
ENGL 2130

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better. Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.

3
ENGL 2110

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better. This course explores the history of the human experience through literature and writing across the cultures of the world. Surveys of important works across multiple genres of fiction and non-fiction as a reflection of cultural values. Explores themes from the ancient through modern era.

3
HUMN 1101

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.

3
MUSC 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Explores the analysis of well-known works of music, their compositions, and the relationship to their periods. An introduction to locating, acquiring, and documenting information resources lays the foundation for research to include the creative and critical process, the themes of music, the formal elements of composition, and the placing of music in the historical context. Topics include historical and cultural development represented in musical arts.

3
2. Institutional Credit 3
COLL 1500

This course is designed to provide tools to assist students to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic and professional success in their chosen occupational/ technical program of study. Topics include: Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Money Management, Study and Test Taking Skills, Stress Management and Wellness, Communications Skills, Career Exploration, Research Skills, College Campus Knowledge, Memory & Reading Skills, Presentation & Interview Skills, and Group Skills. Effective Fall 2016, students who already have an Associate Degree or higher will be given exemption credit for the COLL 1500 course.

3
3. Occupational Courses 37
Marketing Track 21
MKTG 1100

This course emphasizes the trends and the dynamic forces that affect the marketing process and the coordination of the marketing functions. Topics include effective communication in a marketing environment, role of marketing, knowledge of marketing principles, marketing strategy, and marketing career paths.

3
MKTG 1130

This course introduces the study of contracts and other legal issues and obligations for businesses. Topics include: creation and evolution of laws, court decision processes, legal business structures, sales contracts, commercial papers, Uniform Commercial Code, and risk-bearing devices.

3
MKTG 1160

This course introduces professional selling skills and processes. Topics include: professional selling, product/ sales knowledge, customer analysis/relations, selling process, sales presentations, and ethics of selling.

3
MKTG 1190

This course introduces the fundamental principles and practices associated with promotion and communication. Topics include: purposes of promotion and IMC, principles of promotion and Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC), budgeting, regulations and controls, media evaluation and target market selection, integrated marketing plans, trends in promotion, and promotion and communication career paths.

3
MKTG 2010

This course introduces competencies required in managing a small business. Topics include: nature of small business management, business management and organizational change, marketing strategies, employee relations, financial planning, and business assessment and growth.

3
MKTG 2210

Pre-Requisite(s): Program Admission This course provides an overview of the steps in establishing a business. A formal business will be created. Topics include planning, location analysis, financing, developing a business plan, and entrepreneurial ethics and social responsibility.

6
Select the remaining 7 credit hours from any of the courses listed below: 7
ENGL 1102

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better. Emphasizes the student*s ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.

3
SPCH 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.

3
PSYC 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Entrance exam reading and writing scores in accordance with approved TCSG admission score levels Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.

3
SOCI 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Entrance exam reading and writing scores in accordance with approved TCSG admission score levels Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.

3
POLS 1101

Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.

3
ECON 1101

Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective

3
ECON 2105

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Provides a description and analysis of macroeconomic principles and policies. Topics include basic economic principles, macroeconomic concepts, equilibrium in the goods and money markets, macroeconomic equilibrium and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies.

3
ECON 2106

Provides an analysis of the ways in which consumers and business firms interact in a market economy. Topics include basic economic principles, consumer choice, behavior of profit maximizing firms, modeling of perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly and monopolistic competition.

3
HIST 1111

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance

3
HIST 1111

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance

3
HIST 2111

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of U. S. History to 1877 to include the post-Civil War period. The course focuses on the period from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War to include geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people. It includes the history of Georgia and its constitutional development. Topics include colonization and expansion; the Revolutionary Era; the New Nation; nationalism, sectionalism, and reform; the Era of Expansion; and crisis, Civil War, and reconstruction.

3
HIST 2112

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate degree level Writing/English & Reading placement test scores Emphasizes the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from 1865 to the beginning of the twenty-first century and will equip the student to better understand the problems and challenges of the contemporary world in relation to events and trends in modern American history. The course also provides an overview of the history of Georgia and the development of its constitution. Topics include the Reconstruction Period; the great West, the new South, and the rise of the debtor; the Gilded Age; the progressive movement; the emergence of the U. S. in world affairs; the Roaring Twenties; the Great Depression; World War II; the Cold War and the 1950's; the 1960's and 1970's; and America since 1980.

3
BIOL 1111

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1111L Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts with a focus on living cells. Topics include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, biotechnology, and evolution.

3
BIOL 1111L

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1111 Selected Lab exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1111. The lab exercises include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, biotechnology, and evolution.

1
BIOL 1112

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 1111, BIOL 1111L Pre/Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1112L Provides an introduction to basic animal and plant diversity, structure and function, including reproduction and development, and the dynamics of ecology as it pertains to populations, communities, ecosystems, and biosphere. Topics include classification and characterizations of organisms, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, principles of ecology, and biosphere.

3
BIOL 1112L

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 1111, BIOL 1111L Co-requisite(s): BIOL 1112 Selected lab exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1112. The lab exercises for this course include classification and characterization oforganisms, plant structure and function, animal structure and function and principles of ecology and biosphere.

1
BIOL 2113

Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101 Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2113L

Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113: ENGL 1101 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.

1
BIOL 2114

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2114L Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.

3
BIOL 2114L

Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2114 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.

1
BIOL 2117

Pre-requisite(s): (BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L) OR (BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2117L Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.

3
BIOL 2117L

Pre-requisite(s): (BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L) OR (BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) Co-Requisite(s): BIOL 2117 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.

1
CHEM 1151

Pre/Co-requisite(s): Degree Level Mathematics Course, CHEM 1151L Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurements and units, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

3
CHEM 1151L

Pre/Co-requisite(s): Degree Level Mathematics Course, CHEM 1151 Selected laboratory experiments paralleling the topics in CHEM 1151. The lab exercises for this course include units of measurements, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

1
CHEM 1152

Pre-requisite(s): CHEM 1151, CHEM 1151L Co-requisite (s): CHEM 1152L Provides an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. This survey will include an overview of the properties, structure, nomenclature, reactions of hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, ethers, halides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, amides; the properties, structure, and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes, as well as, intermediary metabolism. Topics include basic principles, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon derivatives, heterocyclic rings and alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids and fats, proteins, nucleic acids, and intermediary metabolism.

3
CHEM 1152L

Pre-requisite(s): CHEM 1151, CHEM 1151L Pre/Co-requisite(s): CHEM 1152 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1152. The laboratory exercises for this course include basic principles of organic chemistry, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon derivatives, heterocyclic rings and alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids and fats, proteins, nucleic acids, and intermediary metabolism.

1
PHYS 1110

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 AND (MATH 1101, MATH 1103, OR MATH 1111) Pre/Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1110L Introduces some of the basic laws of physics. Topics include systems of units and conversion of units, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.

3
PHYS 1110L

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 AND (MATH 1101, MATH 1103, OR MATH 1111) Pre/Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1110 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in PHYS 1110. The laboratory exercises for this course include systems of units and systems of measurement, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.

1
MATH 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Placement Test Score or Co-requisite MATH 0090. Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.

3
MATH 1103

This course focuses on quantitive skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will be likely to encounter. The course emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined. Students will use appropriate technology to enhance mathematical thinking and understanding. Topics covered in this course include: sets and set operations, logic, basic probability, data analysis, linear models, quadratic models, exponential and logarithmic models, geometry, and financial management.

3
MATH 1111

Co-requisite(s): Appropriate Placement Test Score or Co-requisite MATH 0090 Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
MATH 1113

Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1111 with a “C” or better or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Prepares students for calculus. The topics discussed include an intensive study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum and minimum problems, exponential growth and decay.

3
MATH 1127

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Algebra Placement Test Score or MATH 1111 with a “C” or better. Emphasizes the concepts and methods fundamental to utilizing and interpreting commonly used statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing chi square tests, and linear regression.

3
ARTS 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Explores the visual arts and the relationship to human needs and aspirations. Students investigate the value of art, themes in art, the elements and principles of composition, and the materials and processes used for artistic expression. Well-known works of visual art are explored. The course encourages student interest in the visual arts beyond the classroom.

3
ENGL 2130

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better. Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.

3
ENGL 2110

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better. This course explores the history of the human experience through literature and writing across the cultures of the world. Surveys of important works across multiple genres of fiction and non-fiction as a reflection of cultural values. Explores themes from the ancient through modern era.

3
HUMN 1101

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.

3
MUSC 1101

Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Explores the analysis of well-known works of music, their compositions, and the relationship to their periods. An introduction to locating, acquiring, and documenting information resources lays the foundation for research to include the creative and critical process, the themes of music, the formal elements of composition, and the placing of music in the historical context. Topics include historical and cultural development represented in musical arts.

3
Electives to include any course offered by SRTC: 9
Faculty
Advisor

Psychology Faculty
School of Arts & Sciences
Thomasville

15689 US 19 North, Thomasville, GA 31792
Advisor

English Faculty
School of Arts and Sciences
Thomasville

15689 US 19 North, Thomasville, GA 31792
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